Photo: Dermot Patrick Bracher McGovern, MBBS, DPhil (Oxon), FRCP (Lon)
Dermot Patrick Bracher McGovern, MBBS, DPhil (Oxon), FRCP (Lon)
Year elected: 2014
Current membership category: Active
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
8730 Alden Drive, Suite 2E
Los Angeles, CA 90048
United States of America
Phone: 310 423 3550

Biographical statement

Dr. Dermot McGovern, the Joshua L. and Lisa Z. Greer Endowed Chair in IBD Genetics, studies the role of genetic variation in the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Dr. McGovern completed his medical training at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School, London, and his gastroenterology training in Oxford. During his GI training, he obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Oxford, studying the role of genetics in IBD. He moved to Los Angeles in 2007 as Director of Translational Medicine and Professor of Medicine at the F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. His research interests include the identification of IBD susceptibility genes (including in non-Caucasian populations) and an understanding of the functional consequences of these genes. Dr. McGovern’s group also investigates the role of genetic variation on clinical phenotypes, response to therapy, and natural history in IBD, with a particular interest in the etiology of the extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) of IBD. Cross-immune disease genetic studies have been a natural extension of the group’s interest in EIMs. More recently his group has been exploring the relationship between host genotype and the microbiome (including viruses and fungi), the metabolome, the proteome, the transcriptome, and glycans. Partly through his role as lead for Personalized Medicine in IBD, Dr. McGovern’s group also explores novel strategies and technologies for communicating and translating these findings through to clinical practice.

Institutional affiliations

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Primary)
Dr. McGovern is serving as the ASCI's Institutional Representative.

Specialties

Medicine